Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Magazine: Law didn’t require consent to tape Scaramucci call

In this July 25, 2017, file photo, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci walks back to the West Wing of the White House in Washington.

AP LogoNEW YORK (AP) — Anthony Scaramucci says his profanity-laced phone call that preceded his ouster as White House communications director was recorded without his permission.

But a representative for The New Yorker on Thursday notes that reporter Ryan Lizza wasn’t required by law to get Scaramucci’s consent to record the conversation.

Federal law permits taping telephone conversations if one party consents to the taping — in this case, Lizza. Some places require consent of both parties, but not Washington, D.C., where Lizza took the call.

Scaramucci called Lizza last month and insulted White House aides using vulgar language during the phone interview. The former Wall Street financier was fired July 31 after only 11 days on the job.

Scaramucci used #lowlife to describe Lizza on Twitter on Wednesday.

Scaramucci begins a media tour Sunday with an interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week.” He’ll follow that up with an appearance Monday on Stephen Colbert’s “The Late Show.”


Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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